Apogee Software, Ltd.


Their web site used to be at http://www.apogee1.com/

Contributed on Jul 25, 2013 by LepricahnsGold (104492)

Location & contact information in Oct. 1995:

Apogee Software Ltd.
P.O. Box 496389
Garland, TX 75049-6389

Technical Support: 1-214-278-5655
Fax Support: 1-214-278-4670

Contributed on Aug 29, 2006 by Jeanne (75486)

December, 1994
With the release of Rise of the Triad, Apogee had another major industry first: A parental lock-out feature that parents could use to password protect the game, preventing their children experiencing much of the game's violence and all of the gore. Several future releases employ this feature, including Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior and Balls of Steel. Other game companies have mimicked this feature, too.

Contributed on Jun 17, 2003 by Indra is stressed (20014)

Apogee became the first shareware game company with a home bulletin board system (Software Creations BBS) and a distribution network (reaching over 5000 BBSs at its peak). BBSs were the primary distribution mechanism before the Internet and web became popular. The Software Creations BBS quickly grew from a 3 line system to 150+ lines, and won Boardwatch Magazine's Reader's Choice Poll as the Best BBS two years straight.

Contributed on Jun 17, 2003 by Indra is stressed (20014)

July 1995
Apogee wins a "Special Recognition Award" from the Shareware Industry Foundation for pioneering work in shareware games marketing, with Apogee's founder, Scott Miller, being awarded a "Lifetime Achievement" award. (Only five such awards have been given, and only one to a person in the game industry.)

Contributed on Jun 15, 2003 by Indra is stressed (20014)

Apogee was the first PC games developer to hide cheat modes within games, such as Kingdom of Kroz. Nowadays, nearly every game released has cheat codes and modes that are hidden in games and discovered by players.

Contributed on Aug 16, 2000 by Xantheous (1292)

In 1987, Apogee's first breakthrough was in shareware marketing. Known in the shareware industry as the "Apogee model," their breakthrough method of releasing a portion of a full game (an "episode") as shareware (years before the Internet became popular) was risky and innovative, and done well before other PC game publishers released demos of their games -- now standard practice.

Contributed on Aug 16, 2000 by Xantheous (1292)

There are many companies with the name "Apogee" in their name and it is easy to get confused. Apogee's full name is "Apogee Software, Ltd." and it's official website is http://www.apogee1.com. Not to be confused with "Apogee Software, Inc." whose website is http://www.apogee.com (I guess they beat them to the domain name). There are at least 18 Companies with "Apogee" in their company name, for a more detailed list, try this link here.

Contributed on Aug 16, 2000 by Xantheous (1292)