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subLOGIC

Overview

Known as "The Computer Flight People", subLOGIC (Sublogic Communications Corporation) was a small game company based in Champaign, Illinois. They are best known for the development of Microsoft's original Flight Simulator series in the 1980s, as well as their own flight simulators such as Jet in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

subLOGIC was bought by Sierra in 1995. The subLOGIC name is no longer used; related products are released under the Dynamix label also owned by Sierra.

Overview

subLOGIC was founded by Bruce Artwick while he was a student in University of Illinois at Champaign back in 1979. He created the first "Flight Simulator" for the then primitive Apple II and Radio Shack TRS-80. Originally it was a graphics demo, but it was well received that he added a real "flight model". Thus Flight Simulator is born.

The company was named after sublogic circuits. Bruce thought it sounded cool.

In 1981 Microsoft was interested for a flightsim for DOS, and the program was ported to various platforms including DOS, Apple II, C64, Atari, and more. Scenery now includes multiple cities and airports with authentic runways and taxiways. subLOGIC also released some scenery disks.

In 1986 subLOGIC created Flight Simulator 3 for the Amiga and the Atari ST, with improved graphics, cockpit, and more. It wasn't until 1988 that Microsoft FS3 was released by the PC AT and EGA graphics.

In 1988, internal dissention between Bruce Artwick and acting mananger caused Bruce to resign and founded his own company, Bruce Artwick Organization (BAO). He also took with him a substantial number of subLOGIC employees. He then went on to create FS4 for Microsoft. BAO later also created scenery and aircraft designer for FS4.

in 1990, subLOGIC tried to publish ATP. However, Microsoft, with BAO's backing, promptly sued ATP for using "copyrighted code" which was created for Microsoft FS3 by subLOGIC back then. With the court date set in the far future (1991) and money running out, subLOGIC settled out of court. They were forced to relinquish all referneces to "flight simulator". With those concessions, ATP was published in Winter of 1990.

In 1992, subLOGIC issued "rev D" of ATP, and spent a lot of time creating the new scenery disks for other parts of the US. Unfortunately, the scenery disks cannot support the company's further deveopement. Several promised products were cut and disappeared.

In 1995, Sierra absorbed subLOGIC, primarily for the scenery database for their own flight sims. SubLOGIC products live on in spirit today as part of the Sierra ProPilot series, and "Airline Simulator" in Europe, which is a descendent of ATP.

All Overviews

Known as "The Computer Flight People", subLOGIC (Sublogic Communications Corporation) was a small game company based in Champaign, Illinois. They are best known for the development of Microsoft's original Flight Simulator series in the 1980s, as well as their own flight simulators such as Jet in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

subLOGIC was bought by Sierra in 1995. The subLOGIC name is no longer used; related products are released under the Dynamix label also owned by Sierra.

Contributed by Andy Voss (1633) on Aug 15, 2000. [revised by : elhombredesnudo (3) and Sciere (293810)].



subLOGIC was founded by Bruce Artwick while he was a student in University of Illinois at Champaign back in 1979. He created the first "Flight Simulator" for the then primitive Apple II and Radio Shack TRS-80. Originally it was a graphics demo, but it was well received that he added a real "flight model". Thus Flight Simulator is born.

The company was named after sublogic circuits. Bruce thought it sounded cool.

In 1981 Microsoft was interested for a flightsim for DOS, and the program was ported to various platforms including DOS, Apple II, C64, Atari, and more. Scenery now includes multiple cities and airports with authentic runways and taxiways. subLOGIC also released some scenery disks.

In 1986 subLOGIC created Flight Simulator 3 for the Amiga and the Atari ST, with improved graphics, cockpit, and more. It wasn't until 1988 that Microsoft FS3 was released by the PC AT and EGA graphics.

In 1988, internal dissention between Bruce Artwick and acting mananger caused Bruce to resign and founded his own company, Bruce Artwick Organization (BAO). He also took with him a substantial number of subLOGIC employees. He then went on to create FS4 for Microsoft. BAO later also created scenery and aircraft designer for FS4.

in 1990, subLOGIC tried to publish ATP. However, Microsoft, with BAO's backing, promptly sued ATP for using "copyrighted code" which was created for Microsoft FS3 by subLOGIC back then. With the court date set in the far future (1991) and money running out, subLOGIC settled out of court. They were forced to relinquish all referneces to "flight simulator". With those concessions, ATP was published in Winter of 1990.

In 1992, subLOGIC issued "rev D" of ATP, and spent a lot of time creating the new scenery disks for other parts of the US. Unfortunately, the scenery disks cannot support the company's further deveopement. Several promised products were cut and disappeared.

In 1995, Sierra absorbed subLOGIC, primarily for the scenery database for their own flight sims. SubLOGIC products live on in spirit today as part of the Sierra ProPilot series, and "Airline Simulator" in Europe, which is a descendent of ATP.

Contributed by Kasey Chang (3652) on Dec 19, 2000.