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Don Woods

Game Credits

Design

The Cave Adventure (2011)   (Most of the current features were added by)
Colossal Cave Adventure for Native Client (2011)   (Major features added by)
610 DEAR.BEN (2010)   (Adventure by)
iAdventure (2010)   (Original game by)
Colossal Cave Adventure (2009)   (CCA extended by)
Advent (2008)   (Adventure - The Interactive Original originally written in Fortran by)
ADV770 (2007)   (Based on earlier versions by)
Colossal Cave Adventure (2007)   (Based on original work by)
Colossal Cave (2006)   (Based on the classic adventure by)
Colossal Cave (1994)   (ADVENTURE written by)
Adventure in Humongous Cave (1992)   (Based on "public domain" games by)
Dungeon (1987)   (Inspired by the ADVENTURE game of)
Zork: The Great Underground Empire (1980)   (The original Zork was inspired by the ADVENTURE game of)
Microsoft Adventure (1979)   (Mainframe Enhancements)
 

Programming/Engineering

Colossal Cave Adventure (2014)   (Major features added by)
Adventure (2003)   (Most features of current program added by)
Original Adventure (1987)   (Most of the features of the current program were added by)
 

Thanks

Golden Oldies Volume 1: Computer Software Classics (1985)   (Special Thanks To)
 

Other

Dungeon (1987)   (inspired by the Adventure game of)
 


Developer Biography

Sometimes called the Fathers of Computer Gaming, Will Crowther and Don Woods created the first 'text adventure' for the computer - Colossal Cave Adventure.

From A History of 'Adventure' - Here's where it all began...:

In 1976, Don Woods was working at Stanford University's Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, otherwise known by the acronym SAIL. Woods found a copy of Crowther's rudimentary program left on one of the SAIL computers by some unknown Johnny Appleseed, so to speak.

He contacted Crowther by the simple expedient of sending email to "crowther@sitename," where sitename was every computer then on the Internet, only a mere handful of sites at the time. After corresponding with Crowther and getting his blessings, Woods greatly expanded the program.

At the time, the fantasy writings of J.R.R. Tolkien such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings were very popular, and many of the rooms in the lab were given whimsical names that fit into a Lord of the Rings theme. Printers at the lab were even programmed with an optional "Elvish" font derived from the writing system listed by Tolkien in the appendices to the fantasy series.

Influenced by Tolkien's writing, Woods added touches such as a troll, elves, and a volcano inspired by Tolkien's description of Mount Doom, where Sauron forged the One Ring of Power in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Last updated: Jun 20, 2004