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Darren Schueller

Game Credits

Programming/Engineering

Earth & Beyond (2002)   (Client Programmer)
NBA Live 2001 (2000)   (Software Engineers)
NBA Live 2000 (1999)   (Programming)
NBA Live 99 (1998)   (Programmers)
NBA Live 98 (1997)   (Programming)
NBA Live 97 (1996)   (Programming)
 

Audio

Need for Speed: High Stakes (1999)   (Voice Talents)
Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit (1998)   (Voice Actors)
 

Quality Assurance

Star Trek: The Next Generation - "A Final Uni... (1995)   (Beta Testers)
 

Thanks

Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit (1998)   (Special Thanks)
 


Developer Biography

Darren started programming at 11 years old, and had always dreamed of making games.

After working at an industrial scale company for 6 years, he then went to work for Advanced Gravis in 1994, writing sound driver and game controller applications. It wasn't quite games, but it was alot closer than scales.

After working for Gravis for about two years, he finally ended up at Electronic Arts in 1996, where he started as a frontend engineer on NBA Live 97. He worked on the NBA Live series for 5 iterations of the product, up to and including NBA Live 2001. He had a blast, and made many friends.

He decided he wanted more "online" experience, so he moved to San Diego and worked for EA.COM for a while. It was an amazing opportunity and he had a great time...until EA closed the studio. When that happened, he transferred to Westwood Studios in Las Vegas to help ship "Earth And Beyond" and eventually ended up leaving EA after the Westwood studio was closed.

Darren then joined NTN Buzztime, a company that makes games for the bar and restaurant market. There, he started as a Senior Software Engineer, and after 5 years ended up as Chief Architect. Though the work was fun and challenging, the Southern California lifestyle didn't fit.

That's when he decided to move his family to Austin, TX, where the pace of life is slower, the cost of living lower, and there's a great game-development community. Ironically enough, he ended up back at EA, working in the POGO casual games division. It quickly became evident that POGO was on the fast-track to implosion (by EA standards), so he jumped ship and landed at Multimedia Games, making Casino Slot machines.

Last updated: Aug 14, 2009