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Mevlut Dinc

Also Known As

  • Mev Dinc

Game Credits


Monochroma (2014)   (Co-Producers)
Kabus 22 (2006)   (Producer)
Dual Blades (2002)   (Producer)
S.C.A.R.S. (1998)   (Producer (Vivid Image))
Street Racer (1994)   (Produced by)
Second Samurai (1993)   (Producer for Vivid Image)


S.C.A.R.S. (1998)   (Game Design)
Street Racer (1994)   (Design)
Second Samurai (1993)   (Design, SFX)
First Samurai (1991)   (Vivid Image)
Prodigy (1986)   (Program conceived by)


Hammerfist (1990)   (Amstrad Conversion by)
Ninja Remix (1990)   (Written by)
Last Ninja 2: Back with a Vengeance (1988)   (Written by)
Knightmare (1987)   (Conceived and created by)
Enduro Racer (1986)   (Programmed by)
Prodigy (1986)   (Written by)
Gerry the Germ Goes Body Poppin' (1985)   (By)
Ant Attack (1983)   (Additional programming)


First Samurai (1991)   (Programmed by)


Second Samurai (1993)   (Sound fx)

Quality Assurance

S.C.A.R.S. (1998)   (Play Testing (Vivid Image))
Street Racer (1994)   (Play Testing)


Street Racer (1994)   (Special thanks to)
Last Ninja 3 (1991)   (Special Thanks to)

Developer Biography

From an Edge interview with Mev Dinc:

"It was as a twist of fate that sidetracked Mevlut Dinc from his intended career path and led him to where he is today. He came to Britain from his native Turkey in 1979 intending to take a masters degree in economic planning.

Government policy at the time conspired to focus Dinc in a different direction. Within six years he was carving a name as a pioneering computer game programmer. His first solo title was Gerry The Germ Goes Body Poppin’, a cult hit on the Spectrum.

He soon developed the groundbreaking Prodigy; the first proper scrolling isometric 3D game. The First Samurai, and Street Racer series cemented the reputation of Vivid Image, his Harrow-based development studio, as a byword for quality games.

In recent years Dinc has been beset with business and creative difficulties, and the critical mauling for last year’s PlayStation and N64 racer, SCARS. The problems came to a head in August 1999 with Eidos’s crushing decision to cancel Vivid’s Street Racer 2 project months into development."

Read the whole interview here (archived link. Original address was this).

Last updated: Jun 22, 2014