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QIX (Amiga)

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MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
4.2
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.
Written by  :  *Katakis* (37809)
Written on  :  Dec 19, 2004
Platform  :  Amiga

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Summary

Get your kicks by beating Qix

The Good

Qix is one of my favorite games, and one of the most addictive. It reminds me of the days where I was a young kid playing with my Etch-A-Sketch. I had so much fun drawing lines all over the place, and then shaking the thing in order to delete the crap lines that I did.

The object of the game is simple: Claim your territory by drawing rectangles and other weird objects using a marker, and make them meet with each other. Qix (it is pronounced "kicks", but I usually say "Qwiks"). a series of colored lines that move on the screen, will make your task difficult. If your marker bumps into Qix, or if Qix touches the line, look out. There are also other enemies to watch out for. You see, you have Sparks, two guys who run around the border, as well as any lines that you have drawn, and if you let the red line run out at the top of the screen, there will be more of them who will ruin your day. You have Spritz, the guy that jumps all over the place. Fuse will also appear and run on the line that you are drawing if you start then stop. You must claim at least 65%. (It was 75% in the coin-op version.)

The graphics are very good and are far better than the coin-op version. There are two methods that you can draw rectangles: Taking the fast route or the slow route. In the coin-op version, different plain colors (red or cyan) will fill the rectangle, depending on whether you draw it fast or slow. In the 1989 version of Qix, however, filling a rectangle will produce a pretty pattern that you can use on a piece of clothing, a towel, bedroom/bathroom material, tablecloth, or just about anything that belongs in your house. I quite enjoyed looking at the score and the "clear" counter flip over when you form a rectangle.

The sounds are also very good. In my opinion, the sound effects are much better than the original game, and there is a lot of cool music in this game. Qix can be difficult to some players if they are not used to playing the game, especially if they tend to draw little tiny rectangles, and hurry up with finishing a rectangle (by making contact with the nearest corner) when Qix is in one area, but suddenly zooms across the screen at them. For these users, there is an option in the main menu that lets them practice a game. Once they finally get used too the game, then they can play the game for real. Expert players know how to beat Qix every day in his own game so they can get much further, and they also realize that they should draw really long rectangles as they can before Qix decides to come for them in order to finish the level quicker.

The Bad

Nothing.

The Bottom Line

Addictive game. 1989's version of Qix is much better than the 1981 version, in terms of graphics and sound. This game was developed by Taito, one of the finest game companies around.

Rating: ****