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Hi-Res Adventure #1: Mystery House (Apple II)

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MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
2.4
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.

User Reviews

The first graphic adventure ever *Katakis* (37818) 1.25 Stars1.25 Stars1.25 Stars1.25 Stars1.25 Stars

Our Users Say

Category Description MobyScore
Graphics The quality of the art, or the quality/speed of the drawing routines 2.4
Personal Slant How much you personally like the game, regardless of other attributes 2.2
Story / Presentation The main creative ideas in the game and how well they're executed 2.5
Text Parser How sophisticated the text parser is, how appropriate its responses are, etc. 2.2
Overall MobyScore (12 votes) 2.4


The Press Says

MobyRanks are listed below. You can read here for more information about MobyRank.
60
Techtite
A Legend in gaming!...although not too recommended to re-play now. This was the game that a young Roberta Williams made, via the home PC her husband Ken brought home from work one day. The result is the world's first graphic adventure; the first attempt at incorporating a text adventure with graphics, which were drawn on the top of the screen as you typed in commands below. This concept would make computer game history, although it is, admittedly, quite dated; there is no sound, animation, or even color. It also does not have the timeless replay value of classics such as ZORK. However, it's a pivotal moment in cyber-history, no matter how dated the graphics look today...
40
Adventure Gamers
Back in the late 1970s, Roberta Williams was playing the first text adventure game ever created. The name of the game: Colossal Cave. Roberta soon realized she could design such a game herself, and asked her husband to do the programming. Ken Williams had been coding software for the Apple II for a living and was interested in doing the project with his wife. Roberta came up with an idea that would change the world of computer gaming forever: they were going to associate the typical text descriptions in adventure games with real pictures.