Carrier Command

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Atari ST
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Carrier Command was one of the first real-time strategy games.

You control an advanced cybernetic aircraft carrier complete with fighters, amphibious assault vehicles, laser defenses and a fleet of decoy drones. Your mission is to build a series of resource, factory, and defensive bases spanning an island chain. The only problem? At the other end of the chain is an even more advanced carrier under control of a terrorist organization with the same mission.

As you move around the islands you must decide what facilities to build and where they will best support your advance. Resource islands provide materials that factory islands can use to build weapons and vehicles to replace your combat losses but both will be quickly overrun if the enemy attacks them while you are not present. You also have to ensure that your stockpiles of equipment are stored safely until you can find time to launch a resupply drone to bring them to your carrier.

From your carrier, you can take first person control of your attack aircraft and amphibious tanks and use them to assault enemy islands or even the enemy carrier itself if you're lucky enough to find it. The weapon payloads on your vehicles are completely configurable based on your needs. An island invasion may require launching a virus bomb that will take over the enemy command systems or just blasting the base with a wire guided surface to surface missile.

Ultimately, you have to find and destroy the enemy carrier but, doing so will require a solid supply infrastructure and a strategy for depriving your opponent of his.


Carrier Command Amiga Launching!
Carrier Command Amstrad CPC Weapons
Carrier Command Amiga The Walrus heading back from its mission. Thermopylae is now friendly!
Carrier Command DOS Project Your Power

Part of the Following Groups

User Reviews

3D strategy at it's peak on Atari ST Atari ST El_Freako (175)
Shame about the bugs! Amstrad CPC Colin Pearson (2)
One of the best early 3-D games DOS Susan Montgomery (1)

Critic Reviews

The Games Machine (UK) ZX Spectrum May, 1989 96 out of 100 96
ACE (Advanced Computer Entertainment) DOS Dec, 1989 965 out of 1000 96
ST Action Atari ST Jun, 1988 91 out of 100 91
ASM (Aktueller Software Markt) Amiga Sep, 1991 10 out of 12 83
Amiga Joker Amiga Oct, 1991 82 out of 100 82
Computer and Video Games (CVG) Atari ST Jun, 1988 8 out of 10 80
Happy Computer Atari ST Jun, 1988 78 out of 100 78
Joker Verlag präsentiert: Sonderheft Commodore 64 1990 67 out of 100 67
Computer Gaming World (CGW) Macintosh Jun, 1991 2.5 Stars2.5 Stars2.5 Stars2.5 Stars2.5 Stars 50
Computer Gaming World (CGW) Commodore 64 Nov, 1992 2 Stars2 Stars2 Stars2 Stars2 Stars 40


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1001 Video Games

The Amiga and Atari ST versions of Carrier Command appears in the book 1001 Video Games You Must Play Before You Die by General Editor Tony Mott.

Atari ST version

On the Atari ST disc was a backup-program. You had to wait for the desktop to come on-screen before inserting the disc. The manual specifically commends to make a backup and play from that disc instead of from the original.

Also, the titlemusic would only load if you had a double-sided discdrive in your ST.


The PC, Amiga and ZX Spectrum releases of Carrier Command came with a special bonus, a cassette tape with an extended stereo version of the theme song. It was called Just Another Mission and it was by Dave Lowe, sung by an anonymous female session singer.

The Atari ST and Amiga versions of the game included a short sampled rendition of Lowe's music as the theme tune. The 128K ZX Spectrums had AY chip music, but due to a bug it was not allowed to play all the way through, and so without downloading it the player cannot hear the full piece.


  • Amiga Power
    • May 1991 (Issue #00) - #15 in the "All Time Top 100 Amiga Games"
  • ST Format
    • August 1991 (Issue #8) – #8 Top Atari ST Classic Games (Editorial staff vote)

Information also contributed by Ashley Pomery, El Freako and Mo
Contributed to by Rola (7631), ClydeFrog (10046), Kabushi (141417) and Martin Smith (63028)