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Grand Prix II (DOS)

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Developed by
Released
Platform
89
MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
3.9
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.
Written by  :  Martin Smith (63168)
Written on  :  Feb 23, 2004
Rating  :  5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars

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Summary

The sun always shines on Geoff Crammond

The Good

Formula 1 Grand Prix / World Circuit was a classic simulation, bringing Formula 1 to life with unprecedented detail. The sequel basically does the same using later technology. Visually it's superb, especially if you've got a Pentium level system and can run the high-resolution graphics. The texture-mapped sky is especially stunning.

The range of difficulty levels and driver aids allow everyone from Schumacher to Delatraz to find a level they can compete at, with the process of gradually removing each aid as you imprve meaning that the challenge never stops.

The handling of the cars is precise, with car setup handled in amazing detail. By just using brake balances, gear ratios and wing downforce, you can get a setup capable of winning at a medium difficulty level, but the dampers, springs, roll-bar and the like allow astounding precision.

If you just want an exciting action game based around F1, this is more than up to the job as well - low difficulty with all the aids, 10% race distance, from the back of the grid. If you want the full deal - car setups, full length races with pitstops and tyre/fuel strategies, the chance of mechanical failures - you can get that too.

The game has an internet community beyond almost any other, with a myriad range of improvements available, including most of the world's great racetracks - Laguna Seca and Bathurst are especially nice.

The Bad

The lack of wet weather racing was a shame, but there was still plenty to master. Internet patches came along to have a similar effect though.

The Bottom Line

Not necessarily for the casual player, Geoff Crammond's aim was to recreate every detail of the most expensive sport in the world, giving something to sink your teeth into over a long period of time. And he achieved it.