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Spirit of Excalibur (DOS)

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MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
3.5
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.

Advertising Blurbs

Advertisement in Computer Gaming World, June 1988:
    A New Genre in Computer Gaming...

    Introducing Spirit of Excalibur, the first-ever Fantasy Epic Game!

    A Fantasy Epic Game is a synergistic blend of traditional Fantasy Role-Playing, adventure and combat simulation, for an experience greater than the sum of its parts.

    Spirit of Excalibur is set in the richly detailed world of mountains and rivers, townships and cities, castles and ruins of medieval England. More than 2.5 megabytes of dazzling artwork illustrate your journey. With add-on sound boards, powerfully orchestrated music will carry you away on a sea of enjoyment as you search for objects and solve the puzzles.

    Roam at will across the 16-screen scrolling map of Arthurian Britain. Use the Icon-based interface to check character status, zoom down to the scene level or up to the map, and give directional commands to parties or forces. You can enter, talk, take, trade, drop,attack, and even use magic at the click of a button - no unwieldy commands to memorize or key words to ferret out.

    As in the best FRPs, the knights and lords, wizards and clerics of the court of Camelot are yours to befriend and command. As they undertake their quests, they can interact with the peasants, warriors, maidens, nobles, bandits, and other folk of the time, growing and improving their abilities and skills.

    Spirit of Excalibur also provides opportunities for the tactical planning of a combat simulation. Move troops to strategic points to harry or delay invaders while your knights complete their quests, obtaining the allies or weapons needed to successfully defend the realm from attack.

    Years of historical research ensure that this, at last, is the definitive game on Arthurian legends. Now playing only on powerful computer systems for discriminating game players.

    Contributed by Belboz (6553) on Apr 15, 2001.