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World Circuit (DOS)

87
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100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
3.9
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Written by  :  Steve Hall (322)
Written on  :  Aug 29, 2000
Platform  :  DOS
Rating  :  5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars

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Summary

Geoff Crammond's first Grand Prix game is a masterpiece.

The Good

When first released, this game blew away all comers. It was the first serious Grand Prix simulator on the market, and even today, is only bettered by its sequels.

16 accurately modelled tracks and 26 cars are just the start - free practice, Friday and Saturday qualifying sessions, and a full distance race complete the accuracy of this simulator. A race weekend can easily take a real-time weekend to complete.

You have the ability to setup your car for wing configuration, gear ratios, tyre compounds, brake balance. A good setup will win you the race, whereas a bad one we have you spinning in the grass before you know it. Fortunately for novices there's a whole range of driver aids, including auto-gears, auto-brakes, auto-recovery, etc.

Formula One racing was a little different in these days - pit-stops were optional - tyres were slick - overtaking was allowed - and the season began in Phoenix, USA. This game reproduces these heady days of Mansell, Senna and Patrese, and is a must for all racing fans.

The Bad

This game actually is perfect. It may have been superceeded by GP2 and the brand new GP3, but in 1991 this was state of the art.

The only problem with Grand Prix games, (and it also afflicts football games) is that they become dated quickly due to the annual rule and personnel changes.

The Bottom Line

Absolutely phenomenal. Given the fact that this game is almost a decade old now, it's almost an histroical game. The quality and gameplay are still there, but you'd be racing in a bygone age - great for those of us who remember Formual One in the late 80's/early 90's.