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Gettysburg: The Turning Point

MobyRank MobyScore
Apple II
...
3.6
Amiga
...
3.9
Atari 8-bit
...
3.9

Advertising Blurbs

Back Cover - C64:

    THE BLUE:

    In the weeks before the fateful day of July 1, 1863, the Army of the Potomac under its new commander, General George Meade, was content to follow the movement of the Confederate Army as it pushed toward Pennsylvania. Elements of the two armies did engage in savage fighting along the way, but these clashes paled in comparison to the terrible battle that awaited them in the small farming town named Gettysburg.

    THE GRAY:

    Robert E. Lee directed his Army of Northern Virginia to advance into Pennsylvania for two reasons. The first was to feed and supply his ragged, hungry army with the bounty of this rich land. The second was to lure the Union Army into a decisive battle. That he did, but even he was unprepared for the three bloody days of uncontrolled violence that would be seared into the national memory as the Battle of Gettysburg.

    The Battle of Gettysburg began, not with a bang, but with a whimper. It started on July 1, 1863 as a minor skirmish between some Confederate infantry brigades looking for shoes at Gettysburg and two Union cavalry brigades keeping track of enemy movements. By July 3, it had grown to monumental proportions, consuming some 50,000 Americans as 90,000 Union soldiers hurled themselves against 70,000 Confederate troops.

    GETTYSBURG: The Turning Point is the most detailed and realistic computer simulation of this decisive battle ever made. Using a refined version of the critically acclaimed system first seen in SSI's Battle of Antietam, this game recreates the three-day battle in 42 turns.

    Refinements to an Already Superb System: We've added many refinements (some of which were the excellent suggestions of Battle of Antietam players) to make this game even better than its successful predecessor. Here are some examples:
  • A precise command control system that more accurately reflects the effects of leaders on the battlefield.
  • Ammunition points
  • More realistic fatigue rules
  • Combat is resolved down to each individual soldier, including every artillery man

    Historical Accuracy and Detail: The way the real battle fed upon itself and grew from a skirmish into a full-blown war is accurately portrayed. This is an exciting game of a meeting engagement, where few units confront one another, then more and more troops are thrown in on both sides until two full armies are embroiled in deadly combat.

    A variable reinforcement feature, where divisions and corps can become available up to four hours earlier or later than the historical schedule, simulates the uncertainty of battle that commanders actually faced.

    A slight departure from history, for the sake of a more interesting game, allows cavalry divisions to be used in this battle.

    Three Games in One: Battle of Antietam was praised for its remarkable quality of making a complex subject easy to play for beginners and expert gamers alike. GETTYSBURG: The Turning Point is no different.

    It is actually three games in one. The Basic Game, with simple rules and options, is for anyone who wants to get into the action without delay. (A separate Tutorial is available for the novice.)

    The Intermediate and Advanced Games allow you to make more complex decisions and deal with more intricate rules. But playability is never sacrificed. As an example, line-of-sight is simplicity itself. Press the "V" key and all the squares a given unit can see are instantly highlighted.

    Two Players or Solitaire: During solitaire, the computer can play either or both sides. Can you replace Robert E. Lee and turn the Battle of Gettysburg from a Confederate defeat into victory? As the commander of the Union Army, can you better what General Meade accomplished by preserving victory at a lower cost in human lives?

    The answers are right here in this box.

    Contributed by Jeanne (75620) on Jun 04, 2003.