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Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day! (Nintendo DS)

Everyone
ESRB Rating
Genre
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78
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100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
3.3
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Advertising Blurbs

Back of Case (UK):
    Take the brain age test and compare the score to your real age!

    Daily training by quickly solving simple mathematics, sudoku puzzles, memory exercises and reading aloud can stimulate your brain and keep it fit. Enjoy calculation battles over the Nintendo DS Wireless Communication!

    Contributed by Knyght (645) on Jun 11, 2006.

Press release (8th June 2006):

    Do You Forget People's Names? Do You Forget Where You Put Things?

    TRAIN YOUR BRAIN IN JUST MINUTES A DAY

    8th June 2006
    – Dr Kawashima’s Brain Training: How Old Is Your Brain? launches in the UK tomorrow. Already a phenomenal success in Japan, selling 2.4 million copies to-date, the product stimulates your brain and helps train mental awareness and your long-term memory by being used for a few minutes each day.

    A renowned Japanese neuroscientist, Dr Ryuta Kawashima developed a series of quick but challenging exercises designed to energise the brain. These quick brain exercises have been adapted into software for the Nintendo DS and allow users to train their brain by performing a number of tasks.

    ‘Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training: How Old Is Your Brain?’ goes on sale on Friday at the estimated retail price of around £19.99. It’s never too early to start training your brain, and it only takes a few minutes each day!

    Click onto http://touchgenerations.com to learn more about Dr Kawashima’s Brain Training: How Old Is Your Brain?

    Contributed by Sciere (259607) on Jun 09, 2006.

Pamphlet included with Tetris DS (US) - French:
    Faire de l'exercise est fondamental pour être en bonne santé, physiquement et mentalement, et il existe à présent une facon de rendre l'exercice mental simple et amusant! Inspiré par les travaux d'un célèbre neurologiste japonais, le Professeur Ryuta Kawashima, ce jeu vous offre des activités destinées à stimuler votre cerveau et lui donner l'exercice dont il a besoin!

    SU DOKU
    included!


    Contributed by Joshua J. Slone (4618) on Mar 31, 2006.

Pamphlet included with Tetris DS (US) - English:
    Exercise is the key to good health, both for body and mind--and now there's a way to make mental exercise simple and fun. Inspired by the work of prominent Japanese neuroscientist Professor Ryuta Kawashima, this game features 14 activities designed to help stimulate your brain and give it the workout it needs!

    SU DOKU
    included!


    Contributed by Joshua J. Slone (4618) on Mar 31, 2006.

Press release (16th March 2006):

    Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day

    Format: Nintendo DS™
    Launch Date: 04/17/06
    ESRB: E (Everyone)
    Game Type: Mental Training
    Players: 1-16

    Game Information

    Developed by Nintendo

    KEY INFORMATION

    Give your gray matter the workout that it needs to stay sharp, focused and young. Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day is inspired by a book that was written by Professor Ryuta Kawashima, a prominent Japanese neurologist. His theories revolve around keeping brains young by performing mental activities quickly.
    • Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day is a series of mini-games designed to give brains a workout. Activities include performing simple math problems, counting people going in and out of a house, drawing pictures on the touch screen and reading classic literature out loud.
    • When users start a new game, they will take a series of tests and get a score that shows how old their brains are. This number is called the "Brain Age." As they use the software over a series weeks and months, their mental acuity will improve and the Brain Age will drop, indicating a younger, healthier brain. Progress is charted in graph form.
    • Users can keep up to four save files on one game card. Sharing a game allows them to compare their results with those of family and friends. Users also can send a demo version of Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day to friends or compete with up to 16 players in a battle to see who can solve math problems the fastest.
    How to progress: When users first start a new game, they will be given a Brain Age Check that determines the age of their brains. Each day, they can compete for the high score in any activities that they have unlocked. They also can check the age of their brains once per day. The more training they do, the more activities they will unlock. Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day is designed to be played in small chunks over a long period of time and can hold data from a year of activity.

    Special powers/weapons/moves/features: If users send their friends a wireless demo or have multiple people playing on one game card using DS Download Play, they can compare their scores to see who has the youngest brain.

    The entire game is played with the DS turned sideways to make it feel more like a book.

    Activities:
    Syllable Count – Count the syllables in well-known phrases.
    Reading Aloud – Read classic literature as fast as possible.
    Stroop Test – Say the names of colors as they appear.
    Word Memory – Memorize words that appear on screen.
    Speed Counting – Count to 120 as fast as you can.
    Connect Maze – Draw lines to connect letters and numbers in alphabetical and numeric order.
    Calculation – Perform simple math problems quickly.
    Head Count – Count people as they enter and exit a house.
    Triangle Math – Solve math problems in a certain pattern.
    Low to High – Memorize the position of numbers, then touch them in order from lowest to highest.

    Contributed by Sciere (259607) on Mar 30, 2006.

Press release (9th March 2006):

    Brain Awareness Week Reinforces The Need To Exercise Your Brain

    March 9, 2006

    It's easy to tell when your body is out of shape, but what about your brain? International Brain Awareness Week begins March 13 as baby boomers and others are looking for the best way to exercise their brains.

    Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day for Nintendo DS™ launches April 17 on the heels of the week designed to increase public awareness about the brain. Users write their answers or draw a picture on the portable Nintendo DS touch screen to keep their "DS brains" young and fit by performing mental activities quickly.

    Dr. Elizabeth Zelinski, dean and executive director of University of Southern California's Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, says games like Brain Age can help keep older generations of Americans' minds active. "Americans can do a great deal to maintain and even improve their mental abilities," Zelinski explains. "Aging is about taking on new challenges for our minds. Nintendo's Brain Age is a great way to do that."

    Americans of all ages are always looking for ways to get a mental edge and Brain Age acts as a treadmill for the mind.

    In Brain Age, first-time users take a few tests to establish their DS brain age. Holding the DS like a book, users perform activities like drawing lines to connect letters and numbers in order, counting the syllables in well-known phrases and other brain-stimulating activities. Sharing a game card allows users to compare their results with family and friends.

    For more information about Brain Age, visit www.nintendo.com.

    Contributed by Sciere (259607) on Mar 30, 2006.

Press release (30th January 2006):

    Players Flex Their Mental Muscles With Brain Age For Nintendo DS

    Incredible 'Brain-Training' Craze in Japan Moves across Ocean to the United States

    REDMOND, Wash., Jan. 30, 2006
    – After decades of exercising players' thumbs, Nintendo is now moving to their minds. Brain Age™: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day for Nintendo DS™ will help players flex their mental muscles. Brain Age represents the first in a series of U.S. brain-training titles that already have taken Japan by storm.

    Brain exercise has been a hot topic lately. Baby Boomers and test-prepping school kids alike want to challenge themselves. In fact, a recent Time magazine article cited Brain Age in its exploration of the trend of people looking for ways to exercise their brains.

    But Baby Boomers picking up a video game system? It's not as far-fetched as you might think. Three separate titles in the brain-training series are currently a huge craze in Japan. Each of them has achieved sales of more than 1 million units, with the most recent title hitting that milestone in less than a month. The craze has been fueled largely by older players, many of whom had never played a video game system before.

    Brain Age (known as Brain Training in Japan) was inspired by the work of Professor Ryuta Kawashima, a prominent Japanese neuroscientist. His studies evaluated the effect of performing reading and mathematic exercises to help stimulate the brain.

    "Young or old, everyone looks for ways to get a mental edge," says Reggie Fils-Aime, Nintendo of America's executive vice president of sales & marketing. "Our brain-training series, led by Brain Age, builds on the popularity of word and number puzzles and acts as a treadmill for the mind."

    Brain Age presents players with a series of fun mental brain-training challenges that incorporate word memorization, counting and reading. It even includes sudoku number puzzles, which have become extremely popular features in newspapers around the country. The distinctive touch screen of Nintendo DS lets users write their responses, just as though they were using a PDA. Players even turn the Nintendo DS sideways to make it feel more familiar, like a book. The more often users challenge themselves, the better they become at the tasks and the lower their estimated DS "brain age."

    Nintendo's brain-training series of games represent a cornerstone of Nintendo's aim to expand the world of video games to new audiences. The second title in the series, Big Brain Academy (known as Brain Flex in Japan) offers players 15 fun activities that test their brain powers in areas like logic, memory, math and analysis. Up to eight people can play with a single game card, and each activity takes less than a minute to complete.

    Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day is rated E for Everyone and launches on April 17. Big Brain Academy is Rated E for Everyone and launches May 30.

    Contributed by Sciere (259607) on Mar 30, 2006.

www.nintendo.com:

    Exercise your mind!

    After decades of exercising your thumbs, Nintendo moves to your mind.

    What is Brain Age?

    Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day for Nintendo DS is a fun, rewarding form of entertainment everyone can enjoy, as it helps players flex their mental muscles. Brain Age is inspired by the research of Professor Ryuta Kawashima, a prominent Japanese neuroscientist. His studies evaluated the impact of performing certain reading and mathematic exercises to help stimulate the brain.

    Brain Age presents quick mental activities that help keep your DS brain in shape. Activities include quickly solving simple math problems, counting people going in and out of a house simultaneously, drawing pictures on the Touch Screen, reading classic literature out loud, and more. You can also play sudoku, the number puzzle game which has become an extremely popular feature in U.S. newspapers.

    On your first day of exercise, you will take a series of tests and get a score that determines how old your brain is. This number is called your "DS Brain Age". By performing daily exercises just minutes a day over weeks and months, the better you'll get at the exercises and the lower your DS Brain Age will become.

    Why is brain training good for you?

    We all know as we grow older our bodies change and it becomes important to regularly exercise to maintain health and fitness. Our brain is no different. "Use it or lose it," as the adage goes. New research indicates mental acuity may be strengthened, like muscles, with brain exercises.

    Dr. Elizabeth Zelinski, dean and executive director of University of Southern California’s Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, says games like Brain Age can help keep older generations of Americans’ minds active. “Americans can do a great deal to maintain and even improve their mental abilities,” Zelinski explains. “Aging is about taking on new challenges for our minds. Nintendo’s Brain Age is a great way to do that.”

    That's where Brain Age comes in.

    But how does Brain Age work?

    The Brain Age exercises are designed to stimulate your brain. Solving simple math and logic problems quickly, and reading aloud, have been proven to be effective methods of achieving this goal.

    The distinctive Nintendo DS Touch Screen lets users write their answers with a Stylus pen, just as though they were writing on paper or using a Personal Digital Assistant or "PDA". Furthermore, the Nintendo DS's voice input identifies particular words you'll speak during the Stroop Test.

    Brain Age tracks your progression through each exercise with easy-to-read line charts. Consistently using Brain Age each day will open new exercises to test your ability.

    Baby Boomers and test-prepping school kids alike want to challenge themselves and find ways to stay sharp. Brain Age acts like a treadmill for the mind. With the simplicity of the Nintendo DS, and Brain Age's challenging and rewarding exercises, everyone can stimulate their DS brain, improving speed and accuracy of their game play.

    Contributed by Evil Ryu (54259) on Mar 29, 2006.

Back of Case (US):

    Train That Brain!



    Exercise is the key to good health, both for body and mind - and now there's finally a way to make mental exercise simple and fun. Inspired by the work of prominent Japanese neuroscientist Dr. Ryuta Kawashima, this software features activities designed to help stimulate your brain and give it the workout it needs. Using it for a few minutes each day can make your brain feel fresh and sharp!

    Dr. Kawashima is your Brain Age guide, taking you through every step of the exercises.

    Touch-based controls and over 15 fun activities - including sudoku - make training your brain a snap.

    Contributed by Corn Popper (69780) on Mar 28, 2006.