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Supercross 2000 (PlayStation)

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Advertising Blurbs

EA Product Catalog Winter 1999/2000 - PSX / N64 (Ger):

    SUPERCROSS 2000

    EA SPORTS präsentiert mit Supercross 2000 das Supercross-Ereignis mit Stil. Die Extrem-Motocross-Simulation für die Sony PlayStation und das Nintendo 64.

    www.easport.com
    www.ea.com

    Contributed by Sicarius (61031) on Aug 20, 2006.

www.nintendo.com – Nintendo 64:
    An exclusive license with PACE Motor Sports highlights EA Sports' entry into the highly competitive motocross sweepstakes.

    License & Registration

    Supercross 2000 is fully licensed by PACE Motorsports, a major promoter of indoor motorsports. As a result, 25 authentic Supercross and freestyle riders hurl themselves across your screen when you plug in the Pak. The license is exclusively held by EA Sports, so Supercross 2000 is the only game that will feature the same dudes you watch on ESPN (excluding Jeremy McGrath, who signed with Acclaim Sports to produce Jeremy McGrath Supercross 2000).

    EA Sports has gone above and beyond the call of duty by actually sponsoring a Supercross series for PACE sports. Titled the EA Sports Supercross Series, the real-world tour schedule has been recreated in Supercross 2000. Talk about authenticity!

    Mechanics

    Supercross 2000 gives gamers a number of ways to punish their bodies, including:

    Quick Race Season Quick Freestyle Freestyle Practice

    The action takes place in 16 different stadiums straight from the EA Sports Supercross Series, plus an additional five amateur tracks. Players can choose to race as an established pro rider, or opt to create a fearless rider from scratch.

    Before each race, you can fine-tune your bike to perform perfectly for the track lay-out. Traction, gearing and shocks are all open for adjustment. Both 250cc and 400cc bikes are available, but rookies are advised to begin with the smaller engine.

    Behind the Visor

    Supercross 2000 supports the N64 Expansion Pak, which allows the game to run in a visually pleasing hi res mode. The tracks are completely free of fog or pop-up, and the riders move realistically on the motorcycles. An instant replay feature allows you to admire big air and aggressive passing in ultra slow-mo.

    The framerate suffers when traffic jams occur, but this normally only happens at the beginning of the race. There are some minor collision detection problems during crashes, but the bone-jarring mishaps in Supercross 2000 are gruesome enough to make you cringe. Check out our crash movie (1.94 Megs) to see these awesome accidents in action.

    Handling the Bars

    Overall, EA Sports has succeeded in giving the play control a realistic feel. The physics are more forgiving than they would be in real life, which gives the fun factor a big boost. It's not all smiles, though, because successfully maneuvering through tight corners can be a big challenge. You'll have to work the clutch (Z Button) to take turns smoothly, and it's important to remember that the bikes won't accelerate fully unless your front wheel is pointed straight ahead.

    The tedious cornering may seem monotonous to some, but Supercross fans will likely appreciate the endurance and concentration required to maintain a lead.

    The controls in Freestyle Mode are easier to master, and the wide-open arenas provide fun areas to perform stunts. The authentic stunts are fairly easy to execute, but learning to link combos takes practice. Our freestyle movie (1.70 Megs) provides some examples of these tricks.

    Simultaneous Supercross

    Supercross 2000 allows two players to compete in a joint-jarring race, or both riders can enter the freestyle arena to pull off some simultaneous stunts. When two riders try to yank synchronized nac-nacs over the same gap, it's either a beautiful sight or an ugly collision. Unfortunately, EA failed to optimize Supercross 2000 for more than two players.

    Power-chords and other audio treats are supplied by MxPx, Pulley and the Living End. During races, the tunes take a back seat to color commentary from ESPN's Art Eckman.

    Supercross fans eager to scrape some plastic can get their fix whenever they need it, because EA's entry into the competitive Supercross market is available now.

    Contributed by Evil Ryu (53679) on Aug 26, 2005.