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Prisoner of Ice

MobyRank MobyScore
Windows
71
3.4
PlayStation
...
3.2
SEGA Saturn
...
3.2

Trivia

Concerning the three graphic novels published by Vents d'Ouest and mentioned in another trivia item: they were actually part of an experiment to expand the storyline of the games through comic books. Each volume chronicles the story of a particular character and sheds light on the back-story of the video game.

La Geôle de Pandore (Pandora's Jail) tells the tale of Jorge, the head librarian of Buenos Aires. For players of the game, this is probably the most important of the three books as it relates the final fate of the villain of the game, Ernst Dietrich (which was left open after the game's ending).

Le Glaive du Crépuscule (The Dagger in the Dusk) is about the past of Sears and gives more depth to his role in the storyline.

And last but not least, la Cité des Abîmes (City of the Depths) tells the story of the explorer Bjorn Hamsun and his father, and their discovery of the City of the Old Ones in Antartica. It is also directly linked to the H. P. Lovecraft short story At the Mountains of Madness.

Contributed by Pirou Julien (2308) on Apr 07, 2009. -- edit trivia



As you use the computer terminal in the future, you see a cut-scene which is narrated by a "Howard Phillips Parker." This character not only bares the same name as Howard Phillips Lovecraft, the author responsible for the Cthulhu stories, but also looks conspicuously like him.

Contributed by Apogee IV (2336) on Dec 25, 2007. -- edit trivia



There is a French cartoon book series loosely based on the game (the scenario isn't the same, but there are some common places and characters). The editor is Vents d'Ouest and there are 3 volumes : Le glaive du crépuscule, La geôle de Pandore and La cité des abîmes. The second volume of this series was given in bundle with the video game in a special edition made a few years later by the French magazine PC Soluces (game, comic book and walkthrough for 79 FF = 11 $).




There are indeed two version of the games, VGA and SVGA, but the savegames are not compatible.




The introduction scene could be used as a screensaver (!).




The 200 background pictures were hand-drawn then scanned. The 40 characters were made using Motion Capture.




The game was developed in 18 months and occupied 60 persons.

Contributed by Yeba (60) on Aug 16, 2001. -- edit trivia



When Ryan arrives at the Buenos Aires library, he meets a blind man named Jorge who is the curator. Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) was director of the Buenos Aires public library for some years (although not close to the year 1937, when the game takes place) and began to lose his eyesight in his last years until finally he was completely blind. According to H.P. Lovecraft's writings, the Buenos Aires Library is one of the few places holding a copy of the Necronomicon.

Contributed by n-n (52) on Sep 26, 2000. -- edit trivia



This game is the sequel to Shadow of the Comet, although the continuity won't be apparent until the last 1/4 of the game. Two major characters from the first game show up about that time, and there's even a brief cameo by Lord Boleskine himself.

Prisoner of Ice is loosely based on the H.P. Lovecraft short story "Mountains of Madness" where an American expedition to the Antartic uncovers horrible creatures entombed in slabs of ice as well as a massive lost city beneath the Antartic snow. The game takes place several years after the story during WW II with Nazis having established a secret research base over the site of the lost city.

Contributed by Alan Chan (3601) on Nov 04, 1999. -- edit trivia