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Sons of Liberty

MobyRank MobyScore
DOS
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3.4
Atari 8-bit
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...
Commodore 64
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Advertising Blurbs

Advertisement in Computer Gaming World, April 1988:

    FREE AMERICA!



    FREE EUROPE!



    Now you can fight the war that gave America her independence with Sons of Liberty. We've faithfully recreated the look and feel of the Revolutionary War, where splendidly dressed British redcoats fought upstart rebels in stiff lines and columns.

    Three epic battles make up this game, each increasing in complexity and scale. They can be fought under Introductory, Intermediate or Advanced rules.

    Start the game with the Battle of Bunker Hill. It was a small affair, involving a tiny patch of ground and only a few thousand men. Even under Advanced rules, this scenario can be savored quickly.

    The Battle of Monmouth tested Washington's ability to keep his army together against the adversities of weather and war. Can you do as well?

    Your toughest challenge is the Battle of Saratoga, the turning point of the Revolution. Historically, the British lost. This defeat convinced France to declare war on England, forcing her to fight on two fronts. Will you be able to repeat the outcome?

    Fail and America might still be flying the British jack.

    Next, move up a couple of centuries and fight to determine the fate of Europe with Panzer Strike!

    You'll feel the fury of the German blitzkrieg as it sweeps across the Eastern Front, Western Front and North Africa. This advanced wargame boasts incredible resolution: Each unit symbol represents either and individual tank/gun or a squad of infantry; each square of the 60x60 map, 50 yards.

    Panzer Strike! is also a construction set: Powerful tools allow you to easily create your own maps, troops and missions.

    Fight single battles against another player or the computer. Use setups we've provided or create your own with the versatile construction features. You can also play an entire campaign against the computer. It creates the maps and determines the types of battles and offensive/defensive missions.

    Free America with Sons of Liberty or free Europe with Panzer Strike! Either way, free yourself from mindless, boring entertainment with these exciting, challenging games at your local computer/software or game store today.

    Contributed by Belboz (6553) on Oct 28, 2001.

From the back cover:

    Fight the war that gave America her independence and her Constitution
    ...a war that changed the history of the world!



    SONS OF LIBERTY
    marks SSI's foray into the Revolutionary War. Using our considerable talents in wargaming, we've faithfully re-created the look and feel of that historic conflict, where splendidly dressed British redcoats fought upstart rebels in stiff lines and columns.

    Three epic battles make up this game, each increasing in complexity and scale. And each battle can be fought under Introductory, Intermediate or Advanced rules. In solitaire play, the computer can direct either or both sides.

    The Battle of Bunker Hill serves as an apt entrance to the game, just as it served as the first major battle of the American Revolution. This critical engagement was a small affair, involving only a few thousand men and a tiny patch of ground. Even under Advanced rules, this scenario can be savored quickly.

    The Battle of Monmouth pitted George Washington's winter-hardened veterans against the British in what proved to be a battle of indecisive outcome. What it did show was Washington's leadership, an admirable ability to keep his army together and its morale up against the adversities of weather and war. Can you do as well?

    The Battle of Saratoga - the largest of the three - is regarded as the turning point of the Revolution. The rigid formation of the British proved highly unsuited for the heavily wooded terrain, which favored the Colonial's more flexible run-and-shoot style. Historically the British lost, and her defeat convinced France that it was an opportune time to declare war on England, forcing her to fight on two fronts. Will you be able to repeat the outcome?

    Fail and America might still be flying the British jack.

    Contributed by Belboz (6553) on Sep 22, 2001.