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Atari ST
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A puzzle game loosely featuring licensing from the 7Up soft drink. The gameplay involves up to 4 players, which can be either human or computer, each taking on spots of a particular colour. Starting from opposite corners, they take it in turns to move, either by 'reproducing' one of their spots to form another one in an adjacent square, or by making a jump, losing the square you did have but taking one two spaces away.

When a piece lands next to one of another colour, that piece changes colour into that of their opponent. The winner of each round is either the last player with any pieces left, or the player who has the most pieces left when the level is full.


Spot NES The enemy approaches...
Spot DOS Green player seems to be winning.
Spot DOS Options (EGA)
Spot DOS Copyright (EGA)

Alternate Titles

  • "Spot: The Video Game" -- Game Boy tag-lined title
  • "Spot: The Computer Game" -- DOS tag-lined title
  • "Infection" -- Working title

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User Reviews

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Critic Reviews

The One Atari ST Oct, 1989 89 out of 100 89
Amiga Power Amiga Aug, 1991 5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars5 Stars 83
ACE (Advanced Computer Entertainment) DOS Jul, 1991 800 out of 1000 80
ASM (Aktueller Software Markt) Atari ST Dec, 1989 9.4 out of 12 78
ASM (Aktueller Software Markt) Amiga Dec, 1989 9.4 out of 12 78
Power Play DOS Dec, 1990 77 out of 100 77
PC Joker DOS Dec, 1991 68 out of 100 68
Nintendo Power Magazine Game Boy May, 1991 3.3 out of 5 66
Video Games Game Boy Jan, 1993 64 out of 100 64
ASM (Aktueller Software Markt) DOS Dec, 1991 7 out of 12 58


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The game design was originally devised to be released for £4.99 on Amiga and ST, for the '16 Blitz' budget range. However, the license was added, the presentation modified, and the price tag multiplied. In 1994 Gary Dunne released (as freeware) his own interpretation of the original design, as Infection.
Contributed to by Apogee IV (2334), Martin Smith (63028) and Steven Don (54)