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The Three Musketeers: The Game

The Three Musketeers: The Game Windows Siege of La Rochelle

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Macintosh
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User Reviews

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The Press Says

MobyRanks are listed below. You can read here for more information about MobyRank.
85
WindowsBytten
The game is so good that I actually felt compelled to play it to completion (not always a given when reviewing). Although it has more of an “interactive fiction” feel to it, the freedom to backtrack, go shopping, play some tennis or simply just patrol the streets on the lookout for trouble makes the player feel like they can exert at least some control over the flow of events, and I think that was probably a difficult thing to do in a game that strives to follow the novel so closely. There are some mature themes, although none are explicitly depicted, and the game is certainly suitable for all ages and ability levels.
80
WindowsRPGFan
Video game adaptations of classic novels aren't exactly in high demand. The release of such a game thus comes as both a surprise and a commercial risk. Fortunately, with indie developers like Dingo Games and their classic-to-RPG title The Three Musketeers: The Game, we get something more than a commodity. Thanks to the developers' palpable love for the source material, The Three Musketeers manages to charm and delight, despite its numerous flaws.
50
WindowsGameZebo
Dedication to the source material just can't overcome the stumbles in execution and in the end, The Three Musketeers misses the mark. There's not enough going on to keep most adults interested and while younger gamers might have fun with it, parents should be aware that violence in the game, while not graphic, is plentiful. There are also a couple of implied sexual encounters, complete with cheesy "wah-wah" guitar riffs. With little for the player to do but click when instructed, it feels less like a game than it does an interactive novel, albeit a super-condensed novel that lacks any sort of background or narrative that might help give it context. In that light, you're better off spending this month's game budget on a copy of the book instead. It'll last longer, make more sense and you'll probably have a lot more fun with it, too.