User review spotlight: Carmageddon (DOS). Released in 1997.

Axis & Allies (Windows)

69
MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
2.6
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.
Written by  :  Cyric (50)
Written on  :  Aug 07, 2001

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful

write a review of this game
read more reviews by Cyric
read more reviews for this game

Summary

The accuracy of the board game, with the speed of a game of Risk

The Good

For one, not having to set up or clean up all the little pieces.

You can play any combination of teams. You can play one, two, or all three Allies (or just let the computer play them), or you can play one or both of the Axis. You can also turn the difficulty up or down, depending on your skill level. Personally, I liked to try to play against a hard-level opponent while using my team-mate(s) as easy-level. It makes it really challenging. You could also invite five people over to your PC and play as five different people (though from my experience, finding five people to block out a few hours to play this game was always it's downfall).

The game is amazingly accurate and true to the original board game. There are different sets of rules, or you can single out rules individually. It also allows for different "winning" and "losing" combinations like total domination, loss of an ally, loss/conquer of a Captital, etc. You can even toss in (or throw out) super bombers and the like.

It's so much faster to play, you can probably get 3-5 games in 3 hours. By being able to play so much more often, you can actually learn new things, and undo when you mess up! You can also play two people on one PC - it's really easy.

There are some nifty cutscenes, and sounds are acceptable. There's also a "quick-die-rolling" mode.

The Bad

Well, the graphics really suck for the time-period. They're definitely acceptable, and it really doesn't detract if you like the game. Come to think of it, I don't know *HOW* you could make a board game a real pixel-pusher. It'd be kind of silly.

Sometimes the computer seems to cheat a bit. In fact, I think this is the main difference between difficulty levels. It could just be random chance, but it always seems to happen towards the very end or very beginning of the game (then again, maybe that's just the way chance works). Regardless, after many weeks of playing this game, I noticed that hard-difficulty opponents just won their rolls more often.

As a fair warning, you need to police your use of Undo. This is so heavily prone to abuse, they should have done something like not re-roll all the dice. I could literally wipe out opponents in two dozen rounds by just continuously re-rolling - even against difficult opponents.

The Bottom Line

If Risk was too easy or too basic for you, *this* is your game.

It brings everything in from the board game, and adds a good deal of replayability.

I guess you could say that, as a negative, it didn't bring anything radical or even new to the board game (aside from set-up and tear-down times). I don't know that anything could have been done that wouldn't have destroyed the game, so I don't put it in either negative or positive categories.