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Critic Reviews

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84
Cheat Code Central (Dec 27, 2005)
This game is definitely not for everyone, but if you've been playing Star Wars Galaxy for two years then you're definitely not everyone.
78
IGN (Dec 05, 2005)
If you're playing a powerful combat class at the very top of the food chain, you're pretty much guaranteed a fun time on Mustafar. There's loads to do in terms of hunting and questing and you'll uncover a fairly satisfying story during the course of your stay. But that's it. There's really nothing else going on here. While there are some small design problems here and there, that's the real problem with Trials of Obi-Wan -- that its content really only serves a very select group of players. Low-level characters and those interested primarily in crafting or space combat won't find anything worthwhile here. Designing an expansion pack that can only be enjoyed by the most experienced, most powerful players seems shortsighted to me, particularly so given the developers' recent attempts to broaden the appeal of the game through a substantial redesign of the core system.
70
GameDaily (Dec 31, 2005)
Trials of Obi-Wan is a solid expansion to the Galaxies universe, but we're still baffled as to why Sony Online chose to limit this expansion to only high level players. In addition, the lack of a space zone so you can at least fly your own ship to the planet, is a bit of a downer. However, overall Trials of Obi-Wan brings a new experience to the aging Galaxies title and should offer plenty of gaming hours for high level Galaxies players.
70
Eurogamer.net (UK) (Nov 01, 2005)
So it boils down to this: the expansion is aimed squarely at the high-level ground-based combat players, and is a solid addition of content for them. That only this one group of players is catered to fully though only serves to alienate those left behind and devalues the offering overall.