Tips

Tip #30

Before adding a game entry, check to see if it's in the database first. Doing so will save you the frustration of having the redundant entry rejected.

Tip #3

You can click on any game developer you see to retrieve the list of games that developer has worked on. Some developer entries also have a small picture and biography! For an example, see Jordan Mechner or Michael Berlyn.

Tip #14

You can click on any graphical thumbnail to enlarge it. This is especially useful with box covers.

Tip #80

If a game comes on multiple discs with identical art, you only have to submit a single scan with the comment "Disc 1/x" (where x is the amount of discs).

Tip #77

When selecting countries in release info items, keep in mind that games have different release dates, publishers and distributors for specific regions. The United States and the United Kingdom are almost never listed alongside in the same item. Also, different regions have different product codes, therefor release info items are split, and submitted as separate items.

Tip #43

Our motto? Quality over quantity. We'd rather have missing information than wrong information, so if you're not completely sure of a fact or detail, just leave it blank and we'll take care of it (if it needs taking care of).

Tip #19

When performing a Keyword Search, you don't have to type the full name; just type a few words (if that's all you can remember) and click the magnifying glass to display all partial matches.

Tip #2

Having trouble finding the exact spelling of something? Just type a partial string into the advanced full-site search box and hit enter, and all partial matches will be displayed (as well as exact matches).

Tip #78

Release dates can be hard to track down, especially for older games. Always consult multiple sources and compare them with an attentive eye. You can use developer and publisher websites, press releases, newsgroups or online shopping sites. For older games, you can look up earlier information or sites of defunct companies using the cached pages of www.archive.org. A lot of sites simply copy release dates from each other, so be wary. When a game goes "gold", it is sent out for duplication, that is not the release date. Watch out for "shipping dates" as well, it usually takes some more time before the games actually reach the store. When in doubt, you can leave open the day or the month, but for recent releases, an exact date should be possible.

Tip #21

The PC gaming industry's products were not always conventional, popular, or mainstream. But that doesn't stop us from documenting them! Where else would you learn about such oddities as Timothy Leary's Mind Mirror and Captain Blood? :-)