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The Astronomy Quiz (DOS)

The Astronomy Quiz DOS Title screen

MISSING COVER

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Platform
Genre
Educational
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Critic Score
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
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User Score
5 point score based on user ratings.
Written by  :  Katakis | カタキス (40602)
Written on  :  Jan 24, 2017
Rating  :  2.67 Stars2.67 Stars2.67 Stars2.67 Stars2.67 Stars
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Summary

A quiz game more suitable for people who follow astronomy, while newcomers can learn a thing or two

The Good

In the early Nineties, when Scott Miller's company Apogee was in its infancy , he produced a few quiz games for the company, such as Trivia Whiz and Star Trek: The Next Generation Trivia, but he also produced some others for Softdisk in the late Eighties, and one of them was The Astronomy Quiz. Unlike Miller's previous quiz titles, TAQ wasn't released as a series of volumes, in which the first volume was free to distribute, while you had to pay a small fee to get the rest.

Upon starting the game, the player has the option of using color or monochrome text. It's good that Miller decided to cater for people who couldn't afford a color graphics card back then. Having said that, a graphics card makes everything stand out. Also, the game was designed to be run on any system, no matter what sort of CPU they had at the time.

Players are eventually presented with fifty random multiple-choice questions which cover all aspects of astronomy, its history, the cosmos, and the people who were behind the discoveries. You select from three answers displayed on the screen. If you get an answer incorrect, the correct one is revealed to you. This is great considering that people who have just started in astronomy will learn something new, and they will remember to get it right next time.

Furthermore, if you decide you had enough and quit the game, the screen that follows gives you a rating, as well as a list of references recommended by Miller himself. This way you can buy the book and use it to study up before you tackle the questions again.

The Bad

Not much sound in the game; only a single beep given for an answer, whether it's correct or not. Also, the Bonus Points aspect of the game is pointless.

The Bottom Line

TAQ is yet another quiz-based offering from Softdisk, this time it is all about astronomy. Fifty questions will test your basic knowledge of the subject. Every correct answer will give you a point, while any wrong ones will cause the game to reveal the correct answer, making it ideal for people who are not interested in astronomy to learn something new. They can even study using the reference shown when they decide to quit.