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Print advertisement - PC Player 05/2000:
    GIB MIR STARTERFELD UND FERSENGELD GIB MIR SCHRECKSEKUNDEN,.. PACE-CAR-RUNDEN GIB MIR TEMPORAUSCH, PL√ĄTZETAUSCH GIB MIR JUBEL-SCHREIE UND CHAMPAGNER-WEIHE GIB MIR F1 2000

    Contributed by Patrick Bregger (223295) on Oct 07, 2010.

Press Release:

    UNITED STATES GRAND PRIX AT INDIANAPOLIS DEBUTS IN ELECTRONIC ARTS' F1 2000 FOR PLAYSTATION AND PC

    New Franchise from EA SPORTS is First Game to Include Track

    Redwood City, Calif., March 27, 2000 - The premier open-wheel racing series, Formula One, joins the EA SPORTS lineup today with the launch of F1 2000 for the PlayStation and PC. For the first time since 1991, a Grand Prix race will be run in the United States on September 24, 2000, at the world famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The brand new Grand Prix track being built for the race won't be ready for competition until just before the actual race. However, fans of the sport, and the Formula One drivers who are curious about what the track has in store for them, can experience the twists and turns of this new race now with F1 2000. F1 2000 is the only game currently on the market that features the new track.

    "It's good for the future of the Grand Prix in this country to bring a major race back to America," said Benetton Formula One Driver, Alexander Wurz. "I am really looking forward to the race at Indy, and as it is a brand new track it is helpful to be able to practice on F1 2000 before I get there. EA SPORTS used the actual track blueprints when designing the game, so I know it will be accurate."

    In the tradition of EA SPORTS, F1 2000 allows the player to race as real drivers, in licensed cars and on authentic tracks. F1 2000 is the first Formula One game based on the 2000 season. All the decals and new paint schemes of the Formula One cars are in the game. The in-depth artificial intelligence (AI) models opponent driver and car characteristics. Pit crew radio communications and team strategy brings home the Formula One driving experience. Technical input from Formula One teams and drivers ensure the best car dynamics and realism to date can be found in F1 2000.

    A realistic multidimensional physics model makes F1 2000 an authentic racing simulation, while at the same time providing a fun and easy-to-race driving experience. This combination of sim-like depth and easy-to-learn driving mechanics makes the game fun for first time racers to enjoy right away. In fact, braking and steering assists can help novices get around the courses with one-button ease. As players spend more time with the game they can turn down the assists for a true simulation experience. The game is also deep enough for those Formula One fans who want to tinker with the car mechanics and tune the vehicle exactly as they wish for a particular race or driving condition.

    Each team and car is recreated perfectly from the shape of the car down to the smallest sponsor decal. Human driver profiles and stats are tracked and a running history of how the user is performing during the season is recorded. Race day presentation brings the race to life with commentary, analysis, and real-time information that explains what is happening during the race and season.

    Three-dimensional track environments give the race the look, sound and feel of authentic Formula One races. Included in this presentation are Jumbotron screens around the track that show live racing action, and air traffic such as helicopters to give the race the feel of a closely covered media event. Multiple racing views, including cockpit view, are provided, and players can even customize their own driving views.

    Car setups allow the driver to control downforce, suspension, gear ratios, brake balance, ride height, and other aspects of high performance driving. Advanced artificial intelligence gives the computer controlled drivers in the game the same racing tendencies and characteristics as their real life counterpart. Damage effects on the car are shown in graphic detail and affect how the car performs.

    Mechanical failures can occur during the game, just as in real life. Ear splitting V10 engines, recorded from actual Formula One cars, brings the sound element of the game to life. Digital recorders were set up in various cars (both nose cones and cockpit) and also at several points outside and around the cars. Official Formula One flag rules ensure that all infractions that could occur in a real race happen in the game.

    In the PlayStation version, engine telemetry readouts are provided to help the driver determine exactly how the car is running. This information can be used to help make modifications that are needed in order for the engine to achieve optimal performance. A split-screen mode allows gamers to race against each other and against computer-controlled cars, and up to 22 racers can compete in a time trial. End of race highlights that show the best action from the race are also provided. In the PC version, multiplayer TCP/IP network games of up to eight cars are possible.

    EA SPORTS (www.easports.com) is the leading interactive sports software brand in the world. Its top-selling franchises and games include FIFA Soccer, John Madden Football, NHL Hockey, Knockout Kings, NBA LIVE Basketball, Tiger Woods PGA TOUR Golf, Triple Play Baseball and NASCAR 2000.

    Electronic Arts (NASDAQ:ERTS), headquartered in Redwood City, California, is the world's leading interactive entertainment software company. Founded in 1982, Electronic Arts posted revenues of more than $1.2 billion for fiscal 1999. The company develops, publishes and distributes software worldwide for personal computers and video game systems. Electronic Arts markets its products under eight brand names: Electronic Arts, EA SPORTS, Maxis, ORIGIN, Bullfrog Productions, Gonzo Games, Westwood Studios Combat Simulations. More information about EA's products and full text of press releases can be found on the Internet at http://www.ea.com.

    Contributed by skl (1141) on Mar 03, 2004.