­čÉ│ New! Moby v2023.12.02

Contributions > Descriptions by Spartan_234 (424)

Spartan_234 has contributed 14 descriptions to the database.

Added description to Far Cry: Vengeance · January 31st, 2007

Far Cry: Vengeance is the Wii version of Far Cry: Instincts - Evolution. This version blends the story, levels, and gameplay from that game with levels made exclusively for the Nintendo Wii, such as a training level and some extra levels where you hold positions against waves of incoming enemies. The only multiplayer this version includes is two-player, split-screen Chaos and Predator modes.

Added description to Terrawars: NY Invasion · September 23rd, 2006

Terrawars: NY Invasion is a budget-priced first-person shooter that takes place in an alien-infested New York City. You play as John Armstrong, a medical student that's been drafted into the Army National Guard to fight the aliens. The game plays in standard first-person shooter fashion: Move through the level, kill all the aliens, and try not to get killed by them. In some levels, you'll meet allies who will fight the aliens alongside you.

Your arsenal includes a knife, pistol, assault rifle, shotgun, sniper rifle, and grenades. Some enemies will drop "bio-matter" when they die, which allows you to upgrade your weapons for expanded clip size, faster fire rate, and increased damage.

Added description to Painkiller: Hell Wars · August 18th, 2006

This Xbox version of Painkiller is a collection of the best levels from the original game and its expansion pack, Battle Out of Hell. As Daniel Garner, a once normal man that died in a car accident, you have been sent to Purgatory during a war between Heaven and Hell. You'll blast your way through hordes of monsters as you fight for your purification.

Like the original game, Painkiller: Hell Wars is a retro shooter that plays very similarly to Quake. Your weapons don't need to be reloaded, and switching from weapon to weapon is very quick (no weapon switching animations), a nod to the original Quake. You can collect souls from your fallen enemies to gain health, and collecting 66 souls will turn you into an invincible demon that can instantly kill his enemies with a screen-blurring projectile. If you do well, you'll even be rewarded with power-ups in the form of tarot cards.

Added description to Urban Chaos: Riot Response · August 13th, 2006

In Urban Chaos: Riot Response, you play as Nick Mason, a member of a new anti-terrorist team named T-Zero. Terrorists and gang members have destroyed your city, and your goal is to bring order back to the city while destroying any terrorists and gang members you encounter. Since your enemies are armed to the teeth (usually with meat cleavers, Molotov cocktails, and sawed-off shotguns), you're equipped with a riot shield that can be used by holding the left trigger. It can absorb an infinite amount of projectiles, but you cannot shoot while you are using it. You can get the assistance of firefighters to put out fires, and medics to replenish your health.

Your weapons can be upgraded by earning medals during your missions. You can earn these medals by scoring headshots, arresting enemies with your taser (as opposed to killing them), collecting gang masks, etc. You can even unlock extra missions and weapons by arresting gang leaders at the end of each level, so that the police can interrogate him and find out the gang's next move.

Added description to World War II Combat: Iwo Jima · August 10th, 2006

World War II Combat: Iwo Jima is a follow-up to World War II Combat: Road to Berlin, sporting the same gameplay mechanics and budget price tag of its predecessor.

The gameplay is basically just like any other first-person shooter out there, but you can't pick up any weapons or health during a mission -- instead, your health recharges at the end of each mission and your weapons are automatically assigned for each mission.

The main difference between Road to Berlin and Iwo Jima is that you're now pitted against the Japanese instead of the Germans, as the only surviving member of a squad of Marines during the American conquest of the Japanese island Iwo Jima.

Added description to WarPath · July 19th, 2006

Warpath is a budget-priced first-person shooter from the same people that developed Pariah. As such, the gameplay is very similar to that game. For instance, you can heal yourself with a portable healing tool, and run at speeds so fast that they blur your vision. The main difference between the two games is that the singleplayer game is multiplayer-oriented, similar to Unreal Tournament. There is a storyline, however. You can select from one of three races fighting for the control of a beautiful, resource-rich planet named Kaladi. The Ohm are a cyborg-like race that need the planet's resources to live. The House of Kovos are robots that want to take control of Kaladi because their religion says that they should. The Human Coalition is a group of homeless humans that are trying to find a home.

In the singleplayer game, each arena is connected by a turn-based, Risk-style minigame. There's a zone for each side of the war, each with five arenas, for a total of 15 arenas. When it's your turn, you can choose an arena to attack that's owned by either of the other two sides. When you attack, the other side will try to defend the arena. If you win, you take control of that arena. If you win an attack on certain arenas, you can unlock a new weapon in the game. If you have control of all 15 arenas, you get to play a surprise "boss" arena.

Warpath's weapons and healing tool are also upgradeable. In singleplayer, you get skill-based weapon upgrades between levels. In multiplayer, you upgrade weapons just like you did in Pariah -- pick up weapon energy cores from fallen enemies and upgrade your weapons during gameplay.

Added description to Classified: The Sentinel Crisis · June 5th, 2006

Classified: The Sentinel Crisis is a budget-priced first-person shooter that takes place in a futuristic setting. You play as a mutant super-soldier resembling Master Chief, wearing the military's new "Sentinel" suit that makes him stronger, auto-heals him, and targets enemies. A group of terrorists have managed to find out about the Sentinel suits, and have kidnapped a scientist that helped develop the suits. You must destroy the terrorists and make sure that the Sentinel technology does not fall into the wrong hands.

As with many other budget-priced shooters on the market, the gameplay in Classified: The Sentinel Crisis is very similar to that of the Halo games. Most notably, the auto-healing system is similar to Halo's "shields" system.

Added description to ├ťberSoldier · April 12th, 2006

├ťberSoldier is a first-person shooter that takes place during World War II, when the Nazis have found an ancient Tibetian technique to revive the dead. This technique gives the subject special powers, and the first person that speaks to the subject will be the one that he/she obeys. In their struggle to win World War II, the Nazis have started to use this technique to turn dead German soldiers into super-soldiers called "UberSoldiers" that take advantage of these special powers.

In ├ťberSoldier, you play as Karl Stoltz, a German officer who was killed in a French ambush. Stoltz is now one of the ├ťberSoldier test subjects. Unfortunately for the Nazis, the French discovered the lab that the ├ťberSoldiers were being created in, and the first person that speaks to Stoltz ends up being a French soldier. You guessed it -- Stoltz joins the Allies and is seeking revenge against his former masters.

Along the way, Stoltz will depend on his ├ťberSoldier powers to help him survive. Headshots will power up his bullet shield, which will temporarily make him invincible to enemy fire. Slashing enemies in the head with his knife will give him extra health.

Gameplay is traditional run-'n-gun. You have five weapon slots for a pistol, rifle, machinegun, rocket launcher, and grenade. If you happen to come across another version of the same gun, but you already have that gun, you will need to swap the gun you have for the gun you are picking up by pressing the use button.

├ťberSoldier uses a weapon selection system similar to Half-Life. When you select a weapon, there will be five boxes at the top of the screen that show which weapon is in the corresponding slot, and which one is selected. You then switch to that weapon by pressing the fire button. At all times, you have a knife that you can quickly slash enemies with by simply pressing the melee button. Dead enemies will drop a health pack and their weapons/ammo when they die. There is no friendly fire, and enemies die easier when they are shot in the head.

Added description to Far Cry: Instincts - Predator · March 27th, 2006

Jack has returned to his home on the island of Pompeii. He is approached by a dangerous and seductive Femme Fatale who recruits him to assist her in pulling a small heist inside a Southeast Asian pirate enclave. In the midst of Femme Fatale's caper, Jack finds himself caught in the middle of a murder of a corrupt local magistrate, and goes on the run from panicked pirates who anticipate a government crackdown. As Jack fleas the scene, Doyle contacts him to help stay alive thought his mission to seek and kill the real murderer of the local magistrate.

This package contains Far Cry: Instincts and Far Cry: Evolution with improved graphics for the Xbox 360, as well as an updated version of the level editor originally shipped with Far Cry: Instincts.

Added description to The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion · March 20th, 2006

A lowly prisoner has been cast into the depths of the dungeon in the Imperial capital of the province Cyrodiil. The fate of this prisoner suddenly changed when Emperor Uriel Septim descended into the prison with his guards, fleeing from unknown assassins who have already slaughtered his children. But even an emperor cannot escape his destiny. Before the last assassin delivered the lethal strike, the old emperor entrusted the prisoner with the Amulet of Kings and asked him to find his illegitimate son, the last of the Septim bloodline. The Septims and the Amulet are the last barrier between the continent Tamriel and the dark dimension of Oblivion, and the delicate balance is threatened by the Daedra Prince of Destruction, Mehrunes Dagon, the prisoner being Tamriel's only hope.

Oblivion is the fourth title in Bethesda's Elder Scrolls series. The game sticks to the style of its predecessors featuring action-based combat, first-person and third-person views, and vast free-roaming environments. The player's chosen race and class determine the abilities the protagonist has in the beginning. The game allows the player to develop multiple types of characters without being limited to a specific role.

The advancement system, as was the case in previous games, is based on skill usage. When the player repeatedly uses one of the skills, it improves. NPCs offer training (for a price) to help in advancing to the next stage. In time the protagonist can become an Apprentice, Journeyman, Expert, and Master and gain certain bonuses for the skill. The skills of the foes are "leveled" to be approximately equal to or slightly above those of the main character.

There are numerous side quests that help the hero advance his or her abilities as well as gain fame. The player is free to roam the world without a particular goal, exploring towns, forts, caves, mines, and old temple ruins. Visiting shrines scattered around Tamriel grants the protagonist specialized skills, some permanent and some temporary.

Weapons and armor wear out with use and need to be repaired either with the help of special non-playable characters or by using an appropriately trained Armorer skill. Enhanced items (weapons, armor, clothing, rings, amulets) abound in the game for protection, resistance, reflection, and special activities like walking on water, exploring underwater, becoming invisible, or lightening the load. It is possible to open the gates to the Oblivion realm to grab their sigil stones, which can be used to make enhanced items. Higher-level mages can create their own spells and enchant weapons, armor, and clothing using filled soul gems in addition to sigil stones.

As opposed to Morrowind, mana points gradually regenerate over time, without the need to rest to replenish them. Active blocking has been added to melee combat. The game features full voice acting for all the NPCs. Dialogues typically contain fewer topics than in Morrowind, but more responses unique to different characters. In addition, the so-called "radiant AI" system makes characters follow their own schedules, engage in various activities, or talk to each other regardless of the player's input. The game features fast traveling, allowing the player to instantly visit Cyrodiil's major cities or previously explored areas.

Added description to Driver: Parallel Lines · March 15th, 2006

Driver: Parallel Lines is the fourth game in the Driver series, following the story of TK. In 1978, TK (who was then an 18-year-old driver-for-hire who had just graduated from high school) was sentenced to 28 years in prison for a crime he did not commit, and is released from prison in 2006. Now, with his driving skills, he seeks revenge against the police department for having to serve time for something someone else should've gone to prison for!

Unlike Driv3r, Driver: Parallel Lines mostly takes place behind the wheel, returning back to the formula that made the first game a classic. The game still has a GTA-style open-ended design, though, and you can still exit your vehicle for some on-foot action. However, there's no reason to exit your vehicle unless it's damaged and you can no longer drive it, as almost all of the game's missions involve cop car chases. If that's the case, then you can either go to the repair shop to repair your vehicle, or just steal someone else's vehicle! Until then, you can punch the cops with your fists and steal their weapons when they're dead, so that you can use them for future on-foot combat.

The game takes place in both 1978 (before TK went to prison) and in 2006. The 2006 setting has a much more modern soundtrack than the 1978 setting, which has a mostly disco soundtrack. Obviously, the 2006 setting has the architecture, technology, and cars of today.

Added description to The Outfit · March 14th, 2006

The Outfit is a World War II game that, unlike many other games in the genre, focuses almost entirely on destruction. While you will usually need to take a tactical approach to gameplay when on foot, you will earn points called "Field Units" that can be used to buy equipment like tanks and gun turrets to destroy Axis soldiers. You can simply buy equipment by using the Y button on your controller in conjunction with the left thumbstick button to select an item to buy. As such, the game developers call The Outfit "destruction on demand". The equipment you buy with Field Units will initially be occupied by AI-controlled soldiers, but you can replace whoever is using the equipment so that you can have some fun blowing stuff up. Sporting a fully destructible environment, almost everything in The Outfit can be blown up.

You can play as one of three characters. Tommy Mac can take lots of damage before dying, and comes equipped with a flamethrower and machine gun, but equipment will cost him more Field Units than other characters. Deuce Williams comes equipped with a rocket launcher and pistol, and doesn't need as much Field Units to buy stuff as Tommy does, but he isn't nearly as strong as Tommy. JD Tyler is the most accurate of the three, sporting a sniper rifle and shotgun, but unfortunately he will die with one shot, so he must take an extremely tactical approach to gameplay.

Added description to Without Warning · March 2nd, 2006

When terrorists invade a chemical plant and the employees are struggling to get out of the plant alive, a Navy SEALs team has come to rescue hostages and trapped employees, as well as killing terrorists and defusing bombs at the plant.

In Without Warning the player is able to control six different characters with overlapping storylines. Three of these characters are the SEALs that come to the plant. The other characters include a security guard and a secretary at the plant, as well as a news reporter whose chopper was shot down at the plant and wants to get a story of what is going on. The game mixes traditional run-'n-gun elements with puzzles such as unlocking doors and defusing bombs.

Added description to America's Army: Rise of a Soldier · February 20th, 2006

This is the console version of America's Army: Operations., the U.S. Army's free "recruitment tool" for computers. As in the original, the single-player campaign simulates a soldier's true Army career from boot camp all the way to the Special Forces. Most of the game's missions involve real-world situations today, and the game uses authentic Army weapons and equipment. The 35 unconnected missions are divided into five missions for each class.

Since the game was developed with the professional advice of actual Special Forces soldiers, it is realistic and forces the player to follow authentic Army tactics. If players use a run-'n-gun approach to the gameplay, they can easily get killed on the battlefield. In multiplayer, the player's experience points determine which class he is able to take.

There are two major changes to this console version. The "build-a-soldier" feature allows the player to fully customize a soldier by changing his name, nickname, face, and even his homestate. Experience points, which are earned at the end of each mission for performing well, can be spent improving the soldier's seven abilities. The experience from multiplayer and single player are separate.