Solomon's Key for the NES was released in Japan on this day in 1986.

Myst IV: Revelation (Windows)

84
MobyRank
100 point score based on reviews from various critics.
4.1
MobyScore
5 point score based on user ratings.
Written by  :  Jeanne (75624)
Written on  :  Mar 31, 2005
Platform  :  Windows
Rating  :  4.83 Stars4.83 Stars4.83 Stars4.83 Stars4.83 Stars

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Summary

Stupendous !! Surpassed my expectations in EVERY respect

The Good

Just when you think you’ve seen everything in point-and-click adventures, along comes one that shows innovation, imagination and introduces real technological improvements. Myst IV Revelation breaks through normality and shows just what we gamers have been missing!

Not just beautiful .. Myst 4’s graphics are breathtaking with special effects that make you feel you are really THERE. The world is in constant motion everywhere you look – birds, insects, flowing water, leaves swaying in the breeze.

Not merely pleasant to hear .. the music is unbelievably fantastic. Sound effects that bring everything to life.

Not simply a good story .. a masterful one with a high immersion factor. Multiple endings provide the gamer a choice. The “good” ending gives a more than satisfactory conclusion to the tale.

Mix in excellent character acting, an intelligent, well-written script, diverse, challenging puzzles, a simple interface, an automatic update launcher (similar to what Sierra used to provide) and you reach the pinnacle in a gaming experience.

Innovations include the lack of inventory (no objects to carry around), the inclusion of an in-game camera (acting as your journal) in which you are able to add your own notes, a “zip” mode for quickly going to pre-visited places, and a layered hint system (accessed from the Options menu).

The Bad

The cursor comes in the form of a “hand” shape and changes with what is being done .. a stationary one, one holding a magnifying glass (for examining something closer), an open hand (mostly used to grab hold of a handle, for instance, and pull/push/turn it), and a pointing fingered hand (for movement). At times, it was a pixel hunt to find the “sweet spot” for interacting with something. In at least two of the most difficult puzzles in the game, this became very irritating. The released patch helps only somewhat in solving that dilemma.

The lack of subtitles means you must turn up the volume and listen carefully. (The Dutch version does contain subtitles.)

The Bottom Line

Very few adventures have a replay value, but this game is a keeper!

Myst IV Revelation shouldn’t be missed! It will help to have played the previous games in the series which provide the background to Revelation’s story.