Pokémon Gold Version

aka: Pocket Monsters 2: Gold, Pocket Monsters Kin (Gold), Pokémon Edición Oro, Pokémon Goldene Edition, Pokémon Versão Gold, Pokémon: Attrapez-les tous! - Version Or
Moby ID: 5515
Game Boy Color Specs
Buy on Game Boy Color
$34.00 used, $499.95 new on eBay
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Description official descriptions

Pokémon Gold takes place several years after Red, Blue and Yellow, and puts the user into a brand new world, Johto. The gameplay is very similar to the previous games, but with several improvements. These include new functions for the player's PokéGear, a Pokédex that can now be sorted by evolution type, and, of course, new Pokémon. Once again, the objective of the game is to become the champion trainer, and try to complete the Pokédex. To become the champion, the player battles Gym Leaders to obtain various badges. Completing the Pokédex requires a different set of actions, and involves capturing wild Pokémon, battling various trainers to obtain money, and trading Pokémon with NPC's and other owners of Pokémon games.

Spellings

  • ポケットモンスター 金 - Japanese spelling
  • 포켓몬스터 금 - Korean spelling

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Credits (Game Boy Color version)

60 People (54 developers, 6 thanks) · View all

Reviews

Critics

Average score: 89% (based on 20 ratings)

Players

Average score: 3.9 out of 5 (based on 58 ratings with 4 reviews)

A sequel as a sequel should be. Classic!

The Good
The original games introduced an easy to master but hard to put down RPG experience. You started out with nothing but would soon get a pokémon. Pokémon are strange creatures that use different types of powers to battle each other. You were a trainer and had to collect these creatures and become the pokémon training champion. At first glance it was a simple RPG, but you would soon discover the complex rock/paper/scissors battle system that had you thinking what characters and moves had to be used in battle. Searching out all pokémon wasn't easy and you had to trade with the other versions to get all of them. Some evolve from others, too.

This game vastly improved upon the original games. It is displayed in colours, has a new world to explore making the map twice as big and adds 100 new pokémon.

But apart from those obvious additions there are also a lot of other things the new versions of pokémon added. This game made all those little issues from Red, Blue and Yellow history by making the gameplay much more accessible. For example, items are organized in categories, pokémon are healed when stored in the PC etc.

There are also bigger gameplay additions, many of which are now common sense to fans. Pokémon can now hold items and new obstacles such as waterfalls and whirlpools will have you looking for new abilities to tackle them. There is also a neat little item called the pokegear which has a map, a radio and a phone. It will be vital to get certain pokémon. Two new types of pokémon, the metal-body Steel-type and the nocturnal Dark-type, add new strengths and weaknesses to the mix. The pokédex, the digital pokémon collectors encyclopedia is much more user-friendly and vastly improved.

The new Johto region expands the landmass of the original Kanto region. Off course there are new towns and new bosses to challenge. It houses many new pokémon and you will also discover some pokémon that evolve from older ones or into them. For example Onix can now evolve into Steelix and Pichu evolves in the well-known Pikachu.

You will be playing for quite a while. You will have to link with the other versions to get all pokémon including the original Game Boy versions. The total of 251 unique characters, the ability to play through the classic Kanto world after playing through the main quest and the ability to battle friends via link cable all add up to a lengthy adventure that still stands as one of the best in the series.

Not only the fact that it adds colours to the pokémon universe adds up to the graphics. The pokémon look much better than they did in Red/Blue/Yellow. The world is slightly more detailed.

Sound is great. Some of the catchiest tunes on the Game Boy Color can be found here and every pokémon has its own distinct cry.

The Bad
It may fall a bit short when compared to recent titles in the series. Nowadays, pokémon can be played online over the internet. Many layers of battling that refined the battle system over the years are not yet present in this game.

Also the storage system for pokémon can be really inconvenient at times. You have to save all the time and when a box in it is full, you can't capture any pokémon. This is really annoying when you finally run into that rare pokémon that you've been looking for for a long time.

The Bottom Line
A great update to the original games. It stays true to the original formula while updating it in many great ways.

Game Boy Color · by Rensch (203) · 2007

An awesome sequel to the original Pokemon Game Paks.

The Good
In the first three Pokemon cartridges, you engaged in a long and enjoyable journey involving catching and training Pokemon in order to defeat hundreds of other trainers as well as gym leaders. That, added to the thrill of trying to catch 'em all, proved to be a great recipe for some awesome gaming. In Gold, that fun is multiplied exponentially. In addition to your world from Red/Blue/Yellow, you now have access to a whole new world, with twice the battles, twice the gym leaders and twice the life span of the game. This is one of the best role-playing game titles on the pocket market, and don't be fooled by those who accuse the series of being too juvenile, because it really isn't.

The Bad
Essentially, your primary focus is battling, and that can get tedious after a while, since most of the trainers are incredibly easy to defeat. Also, the graphics and sound could use some tweaking -- while they're acceptable for the GBC, they could be improved upon. But this game has few negatives.

The Bottom Line
Pokemon Gold is the sequel to the hit games Pokemon Red and Blue (and also Yellow), where you take the role of a budding Pokemon trainer in realizing his dream by traveling through a whole world of cities, seas, caves and the like and catching, raising and battling your "Pokemon" (little creatures that bear similarities to real-life animals.) You train these Pokemon to defeat rival trainers in one-on-one combat with your creatures, including master trainers called gym leaders. One of the main aspects of these older games' enjoyment is the attempt to try to catch all 151 pocket monsters, and now 100 more have been added to your list to try and track down. As your Pokemon grow stronger, the battles get more challenging, and an absorbing story and effective, long-lasting gameplay make this a fantastic role-playing-game.

Game Boy Color · by pocketgamer2000 (20) · 2003

Certainly one of the best games of all time...

The Good
I say this not only because I'm a major "Poke-Fan", but because this game is a puzzle-filled, exciting, surprising, and very very ~~cute~~ game. For the game boy color, the graphics are very colorful and nice, and the game is very innovative!

The Bad
A bit less enjoyable than the Yellow Version, but still very good and flawless!

The Bottom Line
A very nice and neat game by the masterminds at Nintendo, play this one and every single Poke-Game!

Game Boy Color · by Jim Fun (207) · 2001

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Related Sites +

  • Pokèmon Elite 2000
    A Pokèmon fan site good at covering the latest news about coming and existing Pokèmon games.
  • Psypokes
    A comprehensive Pokémon site that pretty much covers everything there is to know about the games.

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  • MobyGames ID: 5515
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Contributors to this Entry

Game added by Jeremy Ou.

Nintendo 3DS added by Rik Hideto.

Additional contributors: Jeanne, Freeman, gamewarrior, DarkDante, Spag, LordRM, Caelestis, Patrick Bregger, Rik Hideto, GenesisBR.

Game added December 17, 2001. Last modified January 8, 2024.